Pressure Injuries in the Neonatal Population

Thursday, March 18, 2021 1:17:58 PM America/New_York

Typically, when we think of skin injury prevention in the acute care setting, we think of that immobile, post trauma, geriatric or surgical patient.  There is a plethora of literature and research around the subject yet each year, more than 2.5 million people in the United States develop pressure injuries.  That 2.5 million people represent many different populations from geriatric to neonate. Risk identification and the implementation of pressure injury prevention interventions are well known in the adult population but what about the neonate? When it comes to pressure injuries, we rarely think of the neonatal population.

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Safe Lateral Positioning for Improved Team and Patient Outcomes.

Wednesday, February 17, 2021 1:34:42 PM America/New_York

The lateral surgical position is one of the most labor-intensive surgical positions that depends on brute force and team strength.  The lateral position is not only physically taxing on the staff, but also can be as hard on the patient; therefore, it is important to have an experienced clinical team member leading the way.  The surgeries that rely on the lateral surgical position vary by specialty and include lateral hip, thoracotomy, spine surgery, or kidney surgery. Many times, the lateral position is preferred over prone when possible for obese patients because the bulk of the patients panniculus can be displaced off the abdomen.  To help improve patient outcomes, this blog will discuss the risk and interventions that are involved with placing a patient in the lateral position.

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Protect the Heels with Evidence Based Interventions

Monday, November 2, 2020 12:30:06 PM America/New_York

The supine position is the most common surgical position with the patient lying on their back with the head, neck and spine in a neutral position.   This position is not without pressure injury risk as there is increased pressure and shear forces to the scapula, occiput, elbows, sacrum, coccyx, and heels. Today we are going to look at ways to mitigate the risk for pressure injuries (PI) to the heel, related to the supine position. When a patient lies supine, all the pressure of their lower legs and feet rest on the heel.  Heel PI represents approximately one third of pressure injuries acquired, and can result in increased morbidity and mortality. In some cases, heel pressure injuries can lead to amputation of the affected limb.

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The Pediatric Surgical Patient

Friday, July 17, 2020 9:08:26 AM America/New_York

The pediatric surgical patient, like any other surgical patient can be vulnerable to pressure ulcers (PU).  Reducing pressure injury development in the pediatric surgical patient can be challenging especially when there is an admitting diagnosis of congenital heart disease (CHD) paired with open-heart surgery (Galvin and Curley 2012). 

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Foam or Gel for Patient Position: What Does the Evidence Say?

Monday, May 18, 2020 1:17:49 PM America/New_York

One of the biggest responsibilities of the operating room (OR) team is to ensure patient safety. There are many facets to patient safety in the OR. Safe patient positioning is a critical facet since the patient is unable to tell you if they are in pain or uncomfortable.  The first step to improved outcomes related to patient positioning is to look to the evidence for guidance when choosing your positioning device.  There are extrinsic and intrinsic factors that contribute to the development of pressure injuries (PI) in the OR, one of the extrinsic factors is prolonged surface interface pressure. In this week’s blog we will look at a scientific comparison between foam and gel used as positioning devices in order to determine best practice. 

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