Safe Lateral Positioning for Improved Team and Patient Outcomes.

Wednesday, February 17, 2021 1:34:42 PM America/New_York

The lateral surgical position is one of the most labor-intensive surgical positions that depends on brute force and team strength.  The lateral position is not only physically taxing on the staff, but also can be as hard on the patient; therefore, it is important to have an experienced clinical team member leading the way.  The surgeries that rely on the lateral surgical position vary by specialty and include lateral hip, thoracotomy, spine surgery, or kidney surgery. Many times, the lateral position is preferred over prone when possible for obese patients because the bulk of the patients panniculus can be displaced off the abdomen.  To help improve patient outcomes, this blog will discuss the risk and interventions that are involved with placing a patient in the lateral position.

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Preventing OR Specimen Errors

Tuesday, December 8, 2020 3:43:58 PM America/New_York

Operating Room Specimen Errors can be devastating as it can affect the patient diagnosis, treatment and outcome.  Imagine having the correct diagnosis given to the wrong patient, or a diagnosis that never makes it to the patient because the specimen is lost! How about those mislabeled specimens, labeled left when it should be right or right when it should be left?  Worse than that, how about the retained specimen that never makes it to the lab because it was “forgotten” to be removed?  

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Posted in Surgical Patient Safety By Sally Fulmer

Protect the Heels with Evidence Based Interventions

Monday, November 2, 2020 12:30:06 PM America/New_York

The supine position is the most common surgical position with the patient lying on their back with the head, neck and spine in a neutral position.   This position is not without pressure injury risk as there is increased pressure and shear forces to the scapula, occiput, elbows, sacrum, coccyx, and heels. Today we are going to look at ways to mitigate the risk for pressure injuries (PI) to the heel, related to the supine position. When a patient lies supine, all the pressure of their lower legs and feet rest on the heel.  Heel PI represents approximately one third of pressure injuries acquired, and can result in increased morbidity and mortality. In some cases, heel pressure injuries can lead to amputation of the affected limb.

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Pressure Injuries: A Never Event, Part 3

Wednesday, September 30, 2020 9:39:38 AM America/New_York

The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel and Pan Pacific Pressure Injury Alliance reports that hospital-acquired pressure injury prevalence in acute care settings to be approximately 10%; their effects on both patients and hospitals is significant. In the previous blogs, we have discussed what can be done to mitigate risk in the preoperative and intraoperative phases of care.  Today, we will discuss the importance of continued risk assessment and interventions in the postoperative phases of care.

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Pressure Injuries: A Never Event, Part 2

Monday, September 21, 2020 1:23:42 PM America/New_York

Last time we talked about the Hospital Acquired Pressure Injury (HAPI) and the unnecessary cost, pain and suffering that can accompany them.  Perioperative pressure injuries are real, as Spector, Limcangco, Owens and Steiner (2016) point  out, perioperative pressure injuries can increase the cost of surgery-related hospital stays by an estimated 44% and may add approximately $1.3 billion annually to health care costs in the United States.  

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